5 Anointing of the Sick Symbols and What They Mean

5 Anointing of the Sick Symbols and What They Mean

Anointing of the Sick is a sacrament in the Catholic Church that is administered to those who are suffering from an illness or injury, and it is meant to bring healing to the mind and spirit as well as the body. During Anointing of the Sick, there are several symbols that are used to represent different aspects of the sacrament. Here are five Anointing of the Sick symbols and what they mean.

The Oil

The oil that is used during Anointing of the Sick is known as the Oil of the Sick. This oil is blessed by a bishop at a Chrism Mass and is used during the sacrament to represent the healing power of God. The oil is applied to the forehead and hands of the person being anointed, and it is a symbol of the Holy Spirit’s presence and healing.

The Cross

The cross that is traced on the forehead of the person being anointed is a symbol of Christ’s love and sacrifice. The person being anointed is being united with Christ in his suffering and is being reminded that their suffering has meaning and purpose in the context of their faith.

The Laying On of Hands

The laying on of hands during Anointing of the Sick is done by the priest or bishop administering the sacrament. It is a symbol of the healing touch of Christ and is a reminder that the person being anointed is being ministered to by the Church community as a whole.

The White Garment

The white garment that is given to the person being anointed is a symbol of purity and renewal. It represents the spiritual renewal that comes with the healing that the sacrament brings.

The Candle

The candle that is lit during Anointing of the Sick is a symbol of Christ as the light of the world. The candle represents the hope that comes with the healing that the sacrament brings and is a reminder that Christ is always present, even in the darkest of times.

FAQs

1. Who can receive Anointing of the Sick?

Anointing of the Sick is meant for those who are suffering from an illness or injury. It can be received by anyone who is in danger of death, as well as those who are preparing for surgery or undergoing medical treatment.

2. Can Anointing of the Sick be received more than once?

Yes, Anointing of the Sick can be received more than once. It is often recommended for those who have a chronic illness or those who are elderly and experiencing a decline in their health.

3. Does Anointing of the Sick only apply to physical illnesses?

No, Anointing of the Sick can be administered for physical, emotional, or mental illnesses. It is meant to bring healing to the whole person, not just their physical body.

4. What if the person being anointed is not conscious?

If the person being anointed is unconscious or unable to respond, the sacrament can still be administered. The priest or bishop will pray for the person and anoint them with the Oil of the Sick.

5. Does Anointing of the Sick guarantee physical healing?

No, Anointing of the Sick does not guarantee physical healing. It is meant to bring healing to the whole person, and while physical healing may be a part of that, it is not the only goal of the sacrament.

6. Is Anointing of the Sick only for Catholics?

No, Anointing of the Sick is not only for Catholics. It can be administered to anyone who is in need of healing, regardless of their religious affiliation.

7. Can Anointing of the Sick be administered outside of a church?

Yes, Anointing of the Sick can be administered outside of a church. It can be done in a hospital, home, or other location where the person being anointed is receiving care.

8. How long does the Anointing of the Sick ceremony take?

The Anointing of the Sick ceremony typically takes around 20-30 minutes. However, the length of the ceremony can vary depending on the individual circumstances and the needs of the person being anointed.

9. Can family members be present during Anointing of the Sick?

Yes, family members can be present during Anointing of the Sick. It is often encouraged for loved ones to be present to offer support and prayers for the person being anointed.

10. Does Anointing of the Sick require confession beforehand?

No, confession is not required before receiving Anointing of the Sick. However, if the person being anointed is conscious and able to receive the sacrament, it is recommended that they make a confession beforehand.

11. Can Anointing of the Sick be done over the phone or online?

No, Anointing of the Sick cannot be done over the phone or online. It is a physical sacrament that requires the presence of a priest or bishop and the use of the Oil of the Sick.

12. What if the person being anointed is too sick to attend Mass?

If the person being anointed is too sick to attend Mass, a priest or bishop can come to their home or hospital room to administer the sacrament.

13. Can Anointing of the Sick be given to someone who has already died?

No, Anointing of the Sick cannot be given to someone who has already died. It is meant for the living and is a sacrament of healing and renewal.

14. Is Anointing of the Sick considered a last rite?

No, Anointing of the Sick is not considered a last rite. It can be given at any time during a person’s illness or injury, and it is not reserved for those who are dying.

In conclusion, Anointing of the Sick is a sacrament that is meant to bring healing and renewal to those who are suffering from an illness or injury. The symbols used during the sacrament represent different aspects of God’s healing power and the person’s relationship with Christ. While Anointing of the Sick does not guarantee physical healing, it is meant to bring healing to the whole person and offer them comfort and support during their time of need.

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About Olivia Moore

Olivia is a writer and Literature major who is interested in studying ancient civilizations, symbolism, history, and how these subjects have shaped modern thought and culture. She has specialized in Greek mythology, a subject that has always stimulated her passion for learning.

In her free time, Olivia enjoys going to the cinema, reading the classics, and playing with her kittens, Rocky and Fluffy. She lives with her husband, David, and their daughter, Samantha, in Aberdeen, Washington State.

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