Should “for thine is the kingdom and the power and the glory forever” be included in the Lord’s Prayer (Matthew 6:13)?

Introduction

The Lord’s Prayer, also known as the Our Father prayer, has been recited by millions of people all over the world for centuries. It is a prayer that Jesus taught to his disciples in Matthew 6:9-13 and has been widely used in various Christian liturgies. The prayer ends with the line, “for thine is the kingdom and the power and the glory forever.” However, there has been an ongoing debate amongst theologians and scholars whether this line is a part of the original biblical scripture or not. In this article, we will explore this topic further and look at the arguments for and against including “for thine is the kingdom and the power and the glory forever” in the Lord’s Prayer.

The Case for Including “For Thine Is the Kingdom and the Power and the Glory Forever”

One of the main arguments for including “for thine is the kingdom and the power and the glory forever” in the Lord’s Prayer is that it is found in the early Christian writings. Many early Christian writers, such as Didache and Tertullian, included this phrase in their versions of the Lord’s Prayer. This suggests that it was a part of the prayer in the early Christian Church.

Another argument is that the phrase highlights the glory and sovereignty of God. It emphasizes that everything belongs to God and that He is the ultimate authority. Including this phrase enhances the sense of awe and majesty surrounding the prayer. Many Christians believe that by adding this last sentence, the prayer brings a sense of completeness and finality.

The Case Against Including “For Thine Is the Kingdom and the Power and the Glory Forever”

Critics of the inclusion of “for thine is the kingdom and the power and the glory forever” argue that it is not found in the earliest manuscripts of Matthew 6:13. The phrase is not included in the Codex Sinaiticus, which is one of the oldest surviving complete biblical manuscripts. Additionally, this phrase is not included in the Lord’s Prayer found in Luke 11:2-4, which suggests that it may have been a later addition to the prayer.

Another argument is that adding “for thine is the kingdom and the power and the glory forever” can lead to confusion and division. There are several different versions of the Lord’s Prayer used by different Christian denominations, and including this phrase could create further variation and discrepancy.

FAQs

1. Is the phrase “for thine is the kingdom and the power and the glory forever” in the original Greek text of the New Testament?

No, the phrase is not found in the oldest surviving complete biblical manuscripts and is not included in the Lord’s Prayer in Luke’s Gospel.

2. Where did the phrase “for thine is the kingdom and the power and the glory forever” come from?

The phrase originated from the ancient Hebrew prayer known as the Kaddish, which was used to sanctify God’s name during Jewish worship services.

3. Why do some versions of the Bible include “for thine is the kingdom and the power and the glory forever” in the Lord’s Prayer?

This phrase was added to the prayer at a later date by translators who believed it enhanced the meaning of the prayer.

4. What do critics think about adding “for thine is the kingdom and the power and the glory forever” to the Lord’s Prayer?

Critics are against including this phrase because it is not found in the earliest manuscripts, and it can lead to confusion and division among Christian denominations.

5. Why do some Christians think that the Lord’s Prayer should not be changed?

Many Christians believe that the Lord’s Prayer was given by Jesus himself and should remain unchanged to preserve its original meaning and intent.

6. Can Christians choose which version of the Lord’s Prayer to recite?

Yes, Christians have the freedom to choose which version of the prayer they recite based on their personal beliefs and traditions.

7. What is the purpose of reciting the Lord’s Prayer?

The purpose of reciting the Lord’s Prayer is to communicate with God and seek His guidance, forgiveness, and protection.

8. Is the Lord’s Prayer recited in all Christian denominations?

Yes, the Lord’s Prayer is a common prayer used by most Christian denominations.

9. What is the importance of “Our Father” in the Lord’s Prayer?

“Our Father” is an address to God and emphasizes the familial relationship between God and His children.

10. Does the Lord’s Prayer have any cultural or historical significance?

The Lord’s Prayer has significant cultural and historical significance as it is widely used in Christian liturgies and has been recited by millions of people throughout history.

11. What is the significance of the last line in the Lord’s Prayer?

The last line, including “for thine is the kingdom and the power and the glory forever,” emphasizes the glory and sovereignty of God and acknowledges Him as the ultimate authority.

12. How can Christians reconcile different versions of the Lord’s Prayer?

Christians can reconcile different versions of the Lord’s Prayer by focusing on the core meaning and intent of the prayer, rather than the specific wording, and by respecting the variations in different Christian traditions and denominations.

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About Emma Miller

Emma Miller has enjoyed working as a writer for over 18 years and holds a Master’s Degree in Linguistics and Education, but has also studied Ancient History and Engish Literature. She is fascinated by the science of dreams and is a long-time member of the International Association for the Study of Dreams

She has a wide range of hobbies and interests, ranging from mythology and ancient cultures to the works of J.R.R. Tolkein and taking care of her extensive garden.

Emma works as one of the staff writers of Rockridge Institute – The Spirit Magazine but also enjoys writing about other topics that interest her for various publications and websites.

She lives with her husband, Tom, and their two cats, Mitzy and Frodo, in San Diego, California.

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