St Patrick’s Day – 19 Interesting Facts

St Patrick’s Day – 19 Interesting Facts

St Patrick’s Day is celebrated annually on the 17th of March all around the world in honour of Saint Patrick, the patron saint of Ireland. From shamrocks to leprechauns, this festival has some fascinating facts. Here are 19 interesting ones:

1) The colour green was not the original colour worn on St Patrick’s Day

The original colour associated with St Patrick’s Day was blue. However, it was later changed to green, which became more popular.

2) More people celebrate St Patrick’s Day in the US than in Ireland

St Patrick’s Day is a national holiday in Ireland, but surprisingly, more people celebrate it in the United States than in Ireland itself. It is the second most popular drinking day after New Year’s Eve.

3) St Patrick was not Irish

St Patrick was actually born in Britain and not Ireland, and it was his missionary work in Ireland that made him a popular historical figure.

4) St Patrick was not originally called Patrick

St Patrick was not originally called Patrick, but his real name was Maewyn Succat. He changed his name to Patricius after becoming a priest.

5) The first St Patrick’s Day parade was held in America, not Ireland

The first St Patrick’s Day parade wasn’t held in Ireland, but rather in Boston, Massachusetts in 1737.

6) The biggest St Patrick’s Day parade is in New York

The largest St Patrick’s Day parade is held in New York and has over 2 million spectators.

7) Shamrocks are associated with St Patrick’s Day because St Patrick used them to teach about the Holy Trinity

St Patrick used the three-leaf shamrock to explain the Holy Trinity to the Irish people when he was teaching Christianity.

8) Chicago dyes its river green every year for St Patrick’s Day

The Chicago River is dyed green every year for St Patrick’s Day. This tradition has been going on since 1962.

9) Leprechauns are not actually associated with St Patrick’s Day

Leprechauns are not historically associated with St Patrick’s Day, but they have become a popular symbol through folklore and commercialisation.

10) St Patrick’s Day is an official holiday in only a few countries

St Patrick’s Day is an official holiday in Ireland, Newfoundland and Labrador (Canada), and Montserrat (a British territory in the Caribbean).

11) The word “drowning” was used instead of “drinking” on St Patrick’s Day in Ireland in the early 20th century

In the early 20th century, the word “drowning” was used instead of “drinking” on St Patrick’s Day in Ireland to discourage excessive consumption of alcohol.

12) The longest-running St Patrick’s Day parade in Ireland is in Waterford

The longest-running St Patrick’s Day parade in Ireland is held in Waterford, and has run annually since 1903.

13) Saint Patrick’s Day is a worldwide celebration

Saint Patrick’s Day is celebrated in different parts of the world, including Japan, Australia, Canada, Russia, and Brazil.

14) Do people celebrate St Patrick’s Day outside of Ireland and the USA?

Yes, St Patrick’s Day is celebrated outside of Ireland and the USA. It is celebrated in more than 50 countries around the world, including the UK, Canada, Australia, Japan, and Russia.

15) What is the history behind St Patrick’s Day?

St Patrick’s Day celebrates the life and legacy of Saint Patrick, who was a Christian missionary in Ireland. St Patrick died on March 17th, which is why the day is known as St Patrick’s Day.

16) What is the significance of shamrocks on St Patrick’s Day?

Shamrocks are associated with St Patrick’s Day because St Patrick used them to explain the Holy Trinity to the Irish people. Each leaf of the shamrock symbolises one of the three persons of the Holy Trinity.

17) Why is St Patrick’s Day associated with the colour green?

St Patrick’s Day is associated with the colour green because it is the colour of Ireland’s flag and the green landscape of the country. It is also associated with the shamrock, which is a significant symbol of Irish heritage.

18) What food is traditionally eaten on St Patrick’s Day?

Corned beef and cabbage are traditionally eaten on St Patrick’s Day. The tradition originated in America, where corned beef was cheaper than bacon, which was traditionally eaten in Ireland.

19) Why do people wear green on St Patrick’s Day?

People wear green on St Patrick’s Day because it is the colour of Ireland’s flag and is associated with St Patrick. It is also believed that wearing green makes a person invisible to leprechauns, who are known for pinching those who aren’t wearing green.

In conclusion, St Patrick’s Day is a national holiday in Ireland, and a widely popular celebration in many other countries. From the colour green to leprechauns, this day is surrounded by some fascinating facts and customs that make it a fun and enjoyable festival to celebrate.

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About Olivia Moore

Olivia is a writer and Literature major who is interested in studying ancient civilizations, symbolism, history, and how these subjects have shaped modern thought and culture. She has specialized in Greek mythology, a subject that has always stimulated her passion for learning.

In her free time, Olivia enjoys going to the cinema, reading the classics, and playing with her kittens, Rocky and Fluffy. She lives with her husband, David, and their daughter, Samantha, in Aberdeen, Washington State.

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